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Solidarity – Darren Grady

‘Solidarity’ by Darren Grady

Getting ready for work.
I’m late.
Just another Wednesday.
Radio on, people saying “a fire that spread quickly”.
Must be overseas, probably a youth hostel.
Because in this country, we have safety regulations…

Later, the magnitude became clear walking across the Millennium Bridge…
A thick trail of smoke heavy on London’s skyline.

I was not directly impacted by Grenfell.
I’m not from the borough, or even London.
Born on Merseyside, Liverpool fan of over 45 years, we had our own tragedy, went through our own campaign for justice.
This article is not a vehicle for the Hillsborough campaign.
I just wanted to write something.
Display Solidarity.
I support, respect and identify with your campaign.
I get Justice for Grenfell.
Justice from the injustice.

Like Hillsborough, the victims are honoured and forever remembered yet sadly the parallels between these two tragic events are akin and both were avoidable.
History played a cruel trick of repeating herself.

I started working for a North Kensington Charity back in September.
One evening, walking back to the tube, I saw Grenfell.
I get Justice for Grenfell.
Justice from the injustice.

Justified anger runs just below the surface in this community, yet all I have witnessed has been compassion and solidarity.
The Authorities are suspiciously wise in hindsight but the foreboding outcome was not a premonition but a stark fact.
A fact repeatedly voiced, a fact repeatedly ignored and yet politicians continue to stress “this must never happen again” and “lessons learnt”.
However, it cannot be used to detract from those accountable being brought to justice for their basic failings in a duty of care.
Saving money but not saving lives.

You will face challenges, you will face setbacks but there are so many alongside you on this shared journey.

I get Justice for Grenfell.
Justice from the injustice.

By Darren Grady
“Darren lives in Essex and has worked in London for the past 25 years.
Born on Merseyside he left the UK aged 21 to travel and work all over the Caribbean.
He returned to the UK and held a number of roles in an “eclectic work history” and until July 2017, worked in the technology sector for a city based company when he quit his career to “give something back” and work in the NFP sector.
Grenfell effected Darren because of the unfortunate similarities in it, to that of the Hillsborough disaster.
Notably, at both tragedies, the authorities were noticeably absent, it was left to the fans and the local community to intervene and help.”

 

Home Office changes to the Grenfell immigration policy

 
Justice 4 Grenfell is deeply concerned about the government’s proposed ‘pathway to settlement’ for undocumented survivors of the horrific fire at Grenfell Tower. This immigration deal offers no certainty, safety or security for traumatised survivors.
 
The Prime Minister has gone back on her promise to Grenfell survivors. In the immediate aftermath of the fire, Prime Minister Theresa May promised a full amnesty to undocumented individuals. Rather than giving them a guaranteed period of five years, this policy in fact provides for two possible extension periods of two years each.
 
This kind of uncertainty will not allow survivors to rebuild their lives, and may impact their confidence in taking part effectively in the Public Inquiry.  In order to access these extensions, traumatised survivors will need to apply, taking part in extensive, rigorous checks, providing details about their personal and financial life, and telling and retelling their stories over and over again. Only at the end of this, if successful, will they be able to apply for permanent residence if they wish.
 
We are also concerned that the Home Office policy for families bereaved by the fire simply does not go far enough. Relatives have been given a six-month visas, yet in many cases it has taken four months for remains to be released and funerals to take place. Those who came here immediately after the fire will need to return in the next 8 weeks, before any substantive hearings at Inquests or the Public Inquiry and before any completion of the police investigation and criminal proceedings.
 
This piecemeal and underhand policy does not encourage undocumented survivors to confidently come forward, and if survivors do not come forward then justice cannot be served.
 
We repeat our call for a full and comprehensive amnesty to allow survivors to take part in the inquiry or for their family members to support them.
 
Justice 4 Grenfell Campaign Co-Ordinator, Yvette Williams, said:
 
‘Nothing has changed. We need a full amnesty for adults and their children. They should not be penalized any further. This policy still means that people who’ve been traumatised will live in fear throughout that period that if they fail an ‘unknown’ criteria they will be sent back to their country of origin.
 
We’re not talking about vast numbers of people. It’s a myth that there were huge numbers of undocumented people living in Grenfell Tower.  The Home Office should not aim for headlines that lure traumatised people to hand themselves over to immigration services. They haven’t explained the hurdles people will have to jump through, or the criteria for rigorous security and criminality checks.
 
People will be afraid to come forward. What if they get a driving ticket? They have to meet fraud checks, but what if they’ve got into the country illegally in the first place? The least the government could do is to offer these people some stability for the future and treat them with some dignity and humanity.
 
The deal for relatives is six months’ guaranteed residence. It’s taken four months to release some of the remains for burial.  What will the arrangements be for these families? How will they be able to support their bereaved relatives through the process?
 
We wouldn’t encourage anyone to present themselves on the basis of what was offered yesterday. Given the information published in the Prime Minister’s Race Disparity Audit earlier this week, you can understand our reservations.
 
If the government wants to understand why these disparities happen, they should look at this as an example of how their policies and legislation adversely impact communities that look like the community who lived in and around Grenfell Tower.

100 Days Since the Grenfell Tower Disaster

Marking 100 Days Since the Grenfell Tower Disaster, Friday 22nd September

One hundred days ago Grenfell Tower was engulfed by flames in the worst, land-based, UK peacetime disaster since WWII. We have witnessed the best and the worst of humanity since those life changing events in the small hours of June 14th. Justice4Grenfell mourns the loss of life, the shattering of a tight-knit community of vibrant, dynamic, talented souls. We offer our heartfelt condolences to all those who’ve lost loved ones, rest assured we will never ever forget and will do everything in our power to ensure those responsible are brought to justice.

No-one can forget the way the community, on the night and in the immediate aftermath, stepped into the void left by the local authority to assist, support and care for their families, friends and neighbours. 100 days later nothing much has changed, the wider local community maintains common humanity, empathy and love looking after the survivors whilst some public and statutory services continue to largely fail in their responsibilities and duty to the survivors, bereaved families, evacuated residents and the wider impacted community.

So much has happened since 14th June, so many promises have been made and broken by the authorities, so much pain, grief, despair, psychological trauma and anger has been endured by the survivors, bereaved families, evacuated residents and wider local community. The situation continues to be an on-going catalogue of blunders and failures; starting with RBKC leadership’s total failure to activate their own emergency/contingency action plan on Day 1.

Lest We Forget

Theresa May visited Grenfell on 15th June to meet the emergency services but not survivors, the ensuing wave of criticism forced her to meet with a small, hand-picked group 2 days later and subsequently. The Prime Minister made the first of many broken promises at that meeting – Grenfell Tower survivors would be rehoused, either temporarily or permanently, WITHIN 3 weeks.

More than 3 months later the majority of survivors and evacuated residents remain in totally unsuitable hotel accommodation, separated from each other and their community, unable to start to try and rebuild their shattered lives, stuck in terrible limbo. Just 34 households have been permanently rehoused, with a further 29 households now in temporary housing. This is shameful. It is doubly so when we know that RBKC has both the highest number of empty properties in the UK and the largest reserves of any UK council.

RBKC not only failed to distribute any of the public’s generously given donations to the community, the council actually removed them from the local organisations that had been receiving and distributing them and put them in storage. Those that weren’t given to the Red Cross (on whose authority we ask?) have been sitting in storage, not reaching those they were intended for. This week saw the return of some of those donations to the local community but only after a long struggle with the council.

When the Prime Minister appointed Judge Moore-Bik to chair the Inquiry, she broke another promise – that the community would be fully consulted over who would be chosen to lead the Public Inquiry and on its Terms of Reference (ToR). Judge Moore-Bik was appointed without any consultation whatsoever. A less appropriate individual would be hard to imagine, his most notorious ruling enabled Westminster Council to rehouse a Social Housing tenant and her children in Milton Keynes – 50 miles away from relatives, work and school. This ruling, overturned 2 years later by the Supreme Court, is seen to have given the green-light to Councils across the UK to “socially cleanse” their boroughs.

Judge Moore-Bik announced on the day his appointment was made public that he had already been given his very narrow Terms of Reference. The ensuing outcry forced him to open a period of consultation over the ToR.

The Judge’s unsuitability to lead the Inquiry remains a live issue, J4G, our members and the wider community found his comments and behaviour at the formal opening session held last week to be further evidence of this. The choice of venue; the requirement for all present to stand when he entered the room (a hired venue and NOT a court of law); his overall tone; his dismissal of the call for survivors to be involved in the Inquiry; his refusal to take any questions all compounded the very real fear that we are looking at another Hillsborough.

Moore-Bik has appointed a team of lawyers and related staff that fails to recognise the need to reflect the very broad ethnic, religious and social diversity of the impacted community in his team or to address this by appointing community advisors to the panel, this is another major source of concern.

The Prime Minister also promised an amnesty for undocumented migrants, initially presented as open-ended, it was subsequently limited to 12 months. Even Moore-Bik has written to the PM saying that it needs to be unlimited otherwise the Inquiry risks not hearing vital evidence. Apparently, the need to really understand what happened on that dreadful night and what led up to it; to learn the lessons that Grenfell can and should teach us, is less important than pandering to an anti-immigration agenda.

One hundred days after the fire, not only do we still not know the final “official” number of fatalities (considered by many in the local community to be closer to 200) we are now being told that the original, confirmed figure of 80 is likely to decrease. This is inconceivable, J4G, the survivors, bereaved families, evacuated residents and the wider local community know this figure of 80 cannot be true. 100 days on there is an increasing sense that a serious, concerted cover-up is going on, that those responsible are doing everything in their power to downplay the scale of the disaster and to dehumanise the victims and the survivors.

ENDS

Note: There will be a candle lit gathering at the Memorial Wall, Bramley Road at 4 pm on Friday 22nd September to mark the 100 day anniversary.